Introduction

Premenstrual syndrome often regarded as PMS is a condition that affects a woman’s emotions, physical health, and behaviour during certain days of her menstrual cycle, generally just before her menses.

In other words, it is the physical and psychological symptoms that females experience in the week or two weeks before  their menstrual period.
Related:  Understanding Menstruation, Menstrual cycle and Ovulation
The most common symptoms of PMS are headaches, bloating, cramps, and mood swings.
These symptoms are a minor inconvenience for some people while for some, it can be so severe that they miss out of work or school.
Some degree of premenstrual syndrome is experienced by most female and over 90 percent of menstruating women report an experience of these symptoms in the very week or two before their period.
PMS symptoms start five to 11 days before menstruation and typically go away once menstruation begins. The actual cause of PMS is unknown.
PMS symptoms can be  mild or severe as the case may be. Though some people have their periods without experiencing any symptoms of PMS.
However, for some people, PMS symptoms can affect their ability to perform regular activities. It may even reduce their quality of life.

Symptoms of PMS

The list of potential symptoms for premenstrual syndrome is long, but most women only experience a few of these problems.
These symptoms include;
A. Psychological symptoms:
  • Anxiety
  • Depressed mood
  • Crying spells
  • Mood swings
  • Changes in appetite and food cravings
  • Insomnia
  • Social withdrawal
  • Poor concentration
  • Change in libido
2. Physical  symptoms include:
  • Joint or muscle pain
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Weight gain related to fluid retention
  • Abdominal bloating
  • Breast tenderness
  • Constipation or diarrhoea
  • Alcohol intolerance

The physical pain and psychological stress are severe enough to affect the daily lives of some people.
In addition, age can affect the severity of PMS. During the transitional period leading up to menopause, people may experience worsening symptoms of PMS.

Regardless of symptom severity, symptoms generally disappear within four days after the start of the menstrual period for most women. Thanks for reading